Interview Preparation – Are you getting the good oil ?

The last week has seen me prep a handful of candidates for a panel interview with one of my leading clients. I had some very nervous first timers as well as some old hands. It was an interesting exercise that I embarked on as I used and implemented a few new tips and tricks that I had picked up from my reading and research of late.It also got me thinking whether we allocate enough time to our candidates and their preparation for interview? Do we give them an honest appraisal of theirs interview ability and therefore assist in improving their shortcomings? Or do we leave them high and dry to fend for themselves once they step through the doors of the interview room.We can spend so much time searching, screening, internally interviewing and short listing the candidates for the assignment, that by the time it comes to interview stage, there can be a bit of fatigue setting into the process from both recruiter and candidate. We should remember that the interview is the crux of the deal and all your client and candidate knowledge needs to be neatly packaged up into digestible form so that your applicant is as well prepared as possible.

I am always open at looking at ways to review my process and I came across this article this morning that gave a very nice summary on the topic at hand. http://www.goarticles.com/cgi-bin/showa.cgi?C=656574 It is written from the candidate’s perspective and points out that they need to make sure that the recruitment consultant has used their firm understanding of the employer’s requirements and interview style to reassure candidates of the skill and personal fit with the organisation. Those candidates should expect role playing where required and that with their own research and that of their recruiter, preparation should be second to none.

So make sure that as a candidate or a recruiter we understand the basic elements of an interview, to establish rapport, exchange information and close the interview. This may take 30 minutes or 2 hours but the same principle applies.

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~ by Rob McClintock on October 24, 2007.

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